Print

 

The paper cutting led to sculptural experimentation, yet print remains vital therefore, the three-dimensional torn and careful constructed fragments shifted, places to creatures.

Two as One
Two as One

Size (CM) W:8.0 H:8.0

Two as One
Two as One

Size (CM) W:8.0 H:8.0

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Topple
Topple

Size (CM) W:18.0 H:25.0

Topple
Topple

Size (CM) W:18.0 H:25.0

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Mark Resist

 

The small paper forms were scanned, enabling a two-dimensional digital drawing. This facilitated a graphic look, however the variation from detail to minimal and darkness to lightness was intriguing. The combination of assorted marks resulted to further Posca and fineliner drawings. ​

Additionally, the mark resist’s transparency led to knots, twists and bends of which, the three-dimensional aspect was triggered.

Etched Foil

The manipulation of the organic forms above encouraged a search for a material that had the delicacy of paper, yet could be manipulated and constructed by hand thus copper foil, comprising of a highly tactile nature, crossing Akhtar’s work into both two and three dimensionality.

The foil was carefully grounded however due to its fragility; a few creases were subtly evident once etched. Consequently, the next piece was deliberately scrunched and etched for a longer duration. Overall, the process sparked intriguing variances hence the documentation.

Close up of drawing

Close up of drawing

Burnished foil and further mark making

Close up of drawing

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Close up of copper foil first inked

Close up of copper foil first inked

Eternity
Eternity

Copper foil inked as an intaglio, printed on Hahnemuhle Etching paper

Close up of copper foil first inked

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Copper Foil

Furthermore, the crumpled effect was captivating and so the foil, no longer etched. In terms of additional mark making, a burnisher and hammer produced dotted and lined elements, initiating two-dimensionality.

 

Cutting, ripping and tearing

Scrunching, inking and printing

Eternity 2018